Sunday, 30 April 2017

SUNDAY NIGHT NEWS - Videos, More Videos, and the Nottingham Poetry Festival


Well, hello there. How's it going? I can't believe it's almost May already! The summer festival season is very nearly upon us, which is pretty exciting, isn't it? I can't wait get my wellies out!

Not a euphemism

I'm doing a quite a few festivals this year, including WOMAD, In Other Words (Cambridge), Badbury Rings Rewind (Dorset), Gate to Southwell (Nottinghamshire), and the Edinburgh Fringe! So, this week, as a bit of a warm up, I've been participating in the Second annual Nottingham Poetry Festival - which has been bloody brilliant!

As part of the festival, I've been working with the lovely folk at Nottingham City of Literature, who were kind enough to film one of my poems for me. The poem's called 'No Such Thing as a Bacon Roll', and it's a list poem about all the fabulous things that I love about Nottingham.

Matt Turpin at Nottingham City of Literature worked really hard to put the video together, and loads of local people also got involved to recite some of the lines in the piece too. I'm really pleased with how it all turned out. Check it out below, and let me know what you think!



I was also really fortunate to be able perform at a few shows over the course of the poetry festival, including a fantastic fund-raising event for a local domestic violence charity, and a wonderful sharing session celebrating writing and performance by refugees and asylum seekers.

The first event fell on Thursday evening, when I popped down to the basement room at the Lord Roberts Pub to take part in Women Got Poetic Talent, hosted be the excellent Sarah Camplin. Sarah had gathered together a powerful pride of talented women to perform poetry and music in aid of the Nottingham-based domestic violence charity Equation.

Source

Equation is a fantastic charity that supports survivors of domestic violence (regardless of gender). The organisation also runs programmes to raise awareness of the issues surrounding domestic violence, as well as teaching school-aged children about healthy relationships.

The event itself contained some incredibly harrowing themes, with many of the poets sharing their experiences with mental health issues, suicide, self harm, domestic violence, and abuse. But, although that may sound like quite a tough evening, it was actually really humbling to hear women telling their stories, and hugely uplifting to see how people can overcome terrible situations and use their voices to speak for others.

Midnight Shelley

With fantastic performances from Michelle Hubbard, Midnight Shelley, Katy Gearing, Adeity Shavina, Lytisha Tunbridge, Elvire Roberts, Jodie Hannis, and Anne Holloway, plus a fabulous musical set from Jude Winwood, it really was a great event, and a great way to start the Poetry Festival for me!

Jodie Hannis

Then, on Friday 28th April, I wandered down to Hyson Green Library to take part in the Poetry Festival Library Tour with Henry Normal.

If you don't recognise Henry's name, you'll definitely recognise him from his body of work. He co-wrote The Royle Family with Caroline Aherne and Craig Cash, and he's also produced loads of top TV like Nighty Nighty, Gavin & Stacey, and the Mighty Boosh.

Despite being a big shot in TV Land, Henry's first love has always been poetry - and his home town of Nottingham - which is why he's been so instrumental in setting up the Nottingham Poetry Festival.

Henry Normal (photo from Nottingham City of Literature)

This year, Henry's been touring round Nottingham libraries during the festival week, sharing his stuff and bringing a different local poet to each event. I was very grateful to be invited along to perform, and it was brilliant watch Henry on stage - he's just got such a warm and natural way of speaking to an audience, and his anecdotes were just as funny as his poetry was poignant.

I felt like I learned a lot.

Finally, on Saturday 29th April, I got to host a wonderful event celebrating writing from refugees and asylum seekers from across the East Midlands.

The event was the culmination of the Write Here: Sanctuary creative writing workshops, which I've been working on for the past few months with local poet Rich Goodson.

Rich and I were asked to facilitate a number of creative writing workshops with a group of refugees and asylum seekers from the Women's Cultural Exchange at the Refugee Forum in St Ann's, and we worked with a wonderful group of women for thirteen weeks, writing poems and stories for an anthology produced by the lovely folk at Writing East Midlands.

Creative Writing with Write Here: Sanctuary

The anthology, which also included work from groups in Leicester and in Derby, is due to be published in the coming weeks, but our group were really keen to perform their work in front of an audience, so we secured them a slot at the Poetry Festival, and they were just brilliant! Honestly, I couldn't be prouder of them for how hard they worked, and the fantastic quality of writing that they produced!

The event itself attracted around sixty people - including a mini-bus full of folk from the group in Leicester - and it was a really joyous experience.

Our lovely (slightly blurry) audience

There was a fab selection of food, supplied by the ladies at the women's cultural exchange, and a wonderful range of poems, stories and even songs on stage!

I'm really going to miss working with this bunch!

To end on something almost completely different, I had to let you know that the very nice folks at Sofar Sounds in Leeds recently uploaded a video of a performance that I did for them back in January. Check it out on the link below and let me know what you think! (I particularly like the bored looking audience member halfway through - look closely and see if you can spot her!)



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