Friday, 11 November 2016

POEM - Witness


Today is Armistice Day in UK, which is a time to come together to think about those people who gave their lives in service of their countries in numerous wars across the globe.

It’s so important to remember those who have died in these circumstances, but it’s also vital to understand the horrors of war and the historical context behind conflicts, in order to avoid making the same mistakes over and over again.

In these divided and divisive times, standing up for our collective human rights and looking after each other is more important than ever.

 This poem is about the penalties for desertion during the First World War. I wrote it as part of the Poems for Peace anthology, which was published back in 2015. The poem is called Witness.  

Witness
I have tasted dust and blood
And felt the shrapnel’s sting.
I have moved among the dead
And witnessed everything.

I have dodged the rounds and shells
And heard the bullets sing.
I have moved among the dead
And witnessed everything.

I have felt the fear and shame
Creep beneath my skin.
I have moved among the dead
And witnessed everything.

Some will call it cowardice,
Betraying kith and kin,
But I have moved among the dead
And witnessed everything.

Mortar-worn, I ran from hell
And that’s my only sin.
I have moved among the dead
And witnessed everything.

So fasten feathers to my coat –
I’ll scarcely feel the pin.
For I have moved among the dead,
And witnessed everything.

And I will raise my blindfold
When the firing squad begins,
So when they shoot between my eyes
I’ll witness everything.

And when they write our history,
Please pencil my name in.
Honour me among the dead,
And witness everything.

Source

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